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Getting Published is a Process

Navigate the process to publication with confidence and submit your own manuscript today. 

 

Focus on Peer Review

Peer Reviewers Tell All: A Q&A with Expert Reviewers

The work of peer reviewers can remain somewhat mysterious, particularly for the less experienced author. To better understand how a reviewer crafts their decision and formulates comments, we’ve asked 2 expert reviewers, who have collectively reviewed over 150 published papers. 

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Will Your Paper Be Accepted? What the Editors of RETINA® Look for in Manuscripts

You’ve worked countless nights dissecting data and then drafting and re-drafting your manuscript. Your co-authors finally got back to you with their edits, and the last straggling collaborator has turned in their authorship forms. You double-check the Instructions for Authors page and make sure your references are formatted correctly. The right buttons are clicked in Editorial Manager, and you press the button: “SUBMIT.” What happens next? The editors of RETINA®The Journal of Retinal and Vitreous Diseases, take you through the editorial process for submitting to their journal and provide inside information on what they look for in the manuscripts they publish.

 

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Improving Scholarship by Improving Peer Review

Do you want to become a peer reviewer for a journal? Do you know the kinds of questions peer reviewers ask and the best practices peer reviewers follow when reviewing a paper? Knowing how peer reviewers may assess your article and the questions they may ask can guide you in submitting the best possible version of your article and improve your chances of publication.

 

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Infographic: The Peer Review Process

Before your work is published, it must go through peer-review and be accepted into the journal. This process can take time, which leaves an author asking several questions…

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  • Author Spotlight

    Hassan R. Mir, MD, MBA

    I've authored papers in some of the following journals: 

    Journal of Orthopaedic TraumaJournal of Bone and Joint SurgeryJournal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    The advice I would like to offer new authors:

    The more work you can put in on the front end when writing the protocol and collecting data, the easier it will be to work through the editorial process and get your work published.

    Benjamin W.Y. Hornsby, PhD

    I've authored papers in some of the following journals:

    Ear and Hearing; Journal of the Acoustical Society of America; Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research; American Journal of Audiology; International Journal of Audiology; Journal of the American Academy of Audiology; Seminars in Hearing; Trends in Amplification; Journal of Educational Audiology

    The advice I would like to offer new authors:

    Be receptive and responsive to criticism and be persistent. It may be no surprise to you, but not every reviewer is going to love your paper. Some revisions are likely. When you get your reviews back, if some comments are not as positive as you’d like, give yourself some time before you start to revise and respond to make sure you can look at the comments in an objective fashion. If the editor gives you the opportunity to revise and resubmit, provide a cover letter and point by point response, including the reviewers original comments followed by your clear and concise response, to each comment. You don’t have to agree with every reviewer comment, or make every suggested change-- in fact at some point you’ll probably have reviewers suggesting opposite courses of action. If you disagree with a reviewer’s suggested change, provide a clear rationale for your point-of-view. However, pick your “battles” (those points you want to argue) carefully, remember- most reviewers are volunteering their time to help you! Where appropriate in your response, provide details regarding your specific changes and direct the reviewer to where they can find those changes in your revised paper. This is very helpful for a reviewer and you want to do what you can to make their job easier. This will help them, help you, make your paper better. Finally, nobody likes rejection, but if the editor suggests you look for another publication outlet… that is OK and will save you time in the long run. Unless the reviewers identified a fatal flaw in your study design-- be persistent, modify the paper to address the concerns raised in the initial review and resubmit the stronger paper elsewhere. There are plenty of highly-cited papers that were rejected in their original form. Good Luck!

    Gregory D. Schroeder, MD

    I've authored papers in some of the following journals: 

    Clinical Spine Surgery; SpineJournal of Orthopedic TraumaThe Spine JournalThe Global Spine JournalJNS Spine; and Neurosurgery

    The advice I would like to offer new authors:

    Research can become frustrating, but the most important thing is to keep working to advance your field. Some of the studies that I have done that have received the most attention are projects that took multiple years to finish. 

    Author Services

    In partnership with Editage, Wolters Kluwer is pleased to offer these services for authors. 

  • Training Events

    A guide to open access and publishing in the open access journal Medicine

    Training Type:  Webinar

    Language: English

    This webinar explains the benefits of publishing in the open access journal Medicine®, Wolter Kluwer’s broad-spectrum open access publication. It will also provide a basic general guide on what open access is, its features, and how it works. This webinar will be useful for clinical and academic researchers who want to know more about open access publication and how it will benefit them.

    Previously Recorded

    Language tips for academic writing: helping you communicate your science effectively

    Training Type:  Webinar

    Language: English

    This webinar was aimed at authors who struggle with communicating their science in English, specifically researchers or doctoral students who want to overcome the language barrier and communicate their science effectively in English.

    Previously Recorded

    Choosing the right target journal and navigating editorial processes

    Training Type:  Webinar

    Language: Chinese

    This webinar will provide a practical guide on choosing the right target journal and will demystify editorial processes from the perspective an experienced scholar and journal editor.

    Previously Recorded

    Essentials of academic writing

    Training Type:  Webinar

    Language: Chinese

    After this session, you will gain a working knowledge of effective academic writing, which will help you write more confidently keeping in mind what peer reviewers and international journals require.

    Previously Recorded

    Common errors and publishing tips

    Training Type: Webinar

    Language: Mandarin

    Manuscript writing trainer Gui Su discussed errors that authors typically make when drafting their manuscripts and preparing for publication. This webinar comprised two distinct sections: the first focused on the different elements of a submission package and the manuscript, and the second on other points to keep in mind before submitting a manuscript to a journal.

     

    Previously Recorded

    Common errors and publishing tips

    Training Type: Webinar

    Language: Portuguese

    In this webinar, researcher and trainer Karin Hoch Fehlauer Ale discussed errors that authors typically make when drafting their manuscripts and preparing for publication. This webinar comprised two distinct sections: the first focused on the different elements of a submission package and the manuscript, and the second on other points to keep in mind before submitting a manuscript to a journal.

    Previously Recorded

  • Video Gallery

    Video Series: Discussion with an Editor

    In this 8-part video series, Dr. Anne Woods, Chief Nurse of Wolters Kluwer, and Shawn Kennedy, Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Nursing, discuss their experiences pertaining to certain topics within the publishing industry. Among some of the topics discussed in this series are:

    • The global distribution of authors and readers 
    • The relationship dynamics of major stakeholders in publishing a journal 
    • The manuscript submissions process 
    • Expectations of authors in submitting a manuscript 
    • The importance of ethical standards in publication, predatory journals, and the ethics of authorship
    • And more

     

    Part 1 - An introduction to Wolters Kluwer and the American Journal of Nursing

    In this video, we introduce Wolters Kluwer’s role as a global publisher of 300 journals in medical, nursing, and allied healthcare, as well as the American Journal of Nursing’s snapshot into publishing cutting edge topics for nurses worldwide. 

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    Part 2 - How the American Journal of Nursing helps drive global healthcare research outcomes

    In this video, Shawn Kennedy and Dr. Anne Woods discuss the American Journal of Nursing’s offerings, as well as the geographical distribution of authors and readers. The primary focus at AJN is to publish content that will be relevant to nursing professionals across the globe. This approach has made AJN global in its scope and allows authors from anywhere in the world publish relevant content in it.

     

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    Part 3 - The role of publishers, societies, journals, and authors in increasing research discoverability

    Dr. Anne Woods and Shawn Kennedy share the critical roles and relationships between major stakeholders – publishers, journals, societies, and authors – in the whole cycle of research dissemination and discoverability.

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    Part 4 - Looking at manuscript publishing through a journal editor's lens

    The goal of this discussion is to help authors understand the journal workflow and the rigor behind each published paper. Among some of the topics discussed are: selecting the right journal, submitting a manuscript, plagiarism checks, and the entirety of the peer review process. 

     

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    Part 5 – What every journal editor expects an author to do

    In this video, Shawn Kennedy and Dr. Anne Woods discuss “do’s and don’ts” for authors to consider when submitting their manuscript. Some considerations include the Aims & Scope, style of the journal, considering the purpose and audience, and the importance of submitting your best quality work. 

     

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    Part 6 - Five unethical publication practices journal editors hate to see

    In this video, Shawn Kennedy and Dr. Anne Woods discuss unethical publication practices which are allegedly rampant in publishing and which journal editors need to guard against. 

     

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    Part 7 - Authors beware: How to avoid falling prey to predatory journals and bogus conferences

    The discussion in this video centers on predatory publishers, journals, service providers, and conferences. Shawn Kennedy talks about her experience receiving authorship invitations from predatory journals and adds that the open access model also played a part in increasing the number of predatory publishers. Some sources and movements that help authors find credible journals and publishers are discussed. 

     

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    Part 8 - Ethics of authorship from a journal editor’s perspective

    Publishing is entering into a new era of heightened sensitivity to identify misdemeanor or fraudulent parties. There are marketplaces where research papers are available for sale. Authors caught of passing off someone else’s wok as their own stand to lose everything including their career and reputation. Shawn Kennedy discusses the roles of the journal Editor and publishers as the “watchdogs” standing guard against these practices. 

     

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  • Author Talk!

    The Inaugural Issue: Publishing Your Breakthrough!

    Read the first free-to-read magazine on everyday issues authors face. 

     

    Read Here

    Choosing the Right Journal

    Selecting the right journal is critical to making sure your paper gets published. Consider five key things when choosing the correct journal to submit your research.

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    The Peer Review Process

    Before your work is published, it must go through peer-review and be accepted into the journal. This process can take time, which leaves an author asking several questions…

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    The Journal Impact Factor

    The Journal Citation Report provides scores for journals in the areas of science, technology, and social sciences. What, exactly, makes a journal eligible for an Impact Factor?

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    Sharing Your Work on Social Media

    Congratulations on the publication of your article. Now it’s time to share your work with colleagues using social media. How do you craft your message? Consider these five tips when sharing your work on social media

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